20/20 Software Offers New Tools For Working With Footage

 

20/20 Software is pleased to announce the addition of our newest tools for working with footage in our 20/20 Software system:

Clipping. Our Media Asset Manager creates clips from a master reel and saves them as new media records. In addition, it can create time slices for customer orders and deliver those slices to customers. Our websites allow customers to create time slices and then deliver them on the fly.

Offset Timestamps. Our Media Asset Manager supports offset timestamps, making it easy for the media library to get the correct time slices from the customer. Then, using the clipping feature, easily and efficiently make clips for delivery.

Multi-processing. Our Media Asset Manager processes videos with the ability to make clips, resize, apply timestamps (offset or standard), apply watermarks, and apply text overlays (scrolling or fixed) – all at the same time. In addition, the processor creates posters, thumbnails, and optionally playable thumbnails, all as part of the same video-processing action.

Batch processing. All the features of multi-processing can be done in batch.

Don Resnick, President of 20/20 Software, said “We’re excited to add these new features to our software’s current video functionality. These new features join our existing enhancements for footage and video functionality, giving our clients the ability to offer clipping, pricing, and online delivery – all in a seamless and satisfying customer experience.”

20/20 Software is a leading provider of multi-media websites and image/business management software to media libraries, museums, corporations, institutions, and newspapers. Please call us at 203.316.5500 in the US to schedule a demo or contact us at sales@twensoft.com for more information about using our multi-media software system platform. Also, visit us at DMLA Table #12 on October 23-24, and at Visual Connections on October 25 at Table #H10-11.

Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act of 2017

DMLA is happy to announce our support for the bill by Representative Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) to create a small claims court within the Copyright Office.  The bill, H.R. 3945,  entitled, the “Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act of 2017” (the “CASE Act”) is also cosponsored by Representatives Tom Marino (R-PA), Lamar Smith (R-TX), Doug Collins (R-GA), Judy Chu (D-CA) and Ted Lieu (DCA).

Here are links to the press release issued by Rep. Jeffries and his colleagues yesterday announcing the introduction of the bill, a press release issued by DMLA and several other visual artist organizations praising the introduction of the legislation, and the bill, H.R. 3945.

 

 

ImageRights Announces Dedicated Copyright Registration Service

ImageRights International, the global leader in copyright enforcement services for photo agencies and professional photographers, today announced the launch of a dedicated copyright registration service. For the first time, any photographer or agency can register their images with the United States Copyright Office through ImageRights highly efficient and precise copyright service. Previously, only ImageRights members had access to the service.

Read more here

Leading Copyright Enforcement Service Imagerights Announces Dedicated Copyright Registration Service


ImageRights International, the global leader in copyright enforcement services for photo agencies and professional photographers, today announced the launch of a dedicated copyright registration service. For the first time, any photographer or agency can register their images with the United States Copyright Office through ImageRights highly efficient and precise copyright service. Previously, only ImageRights members had access to the service.

ImageRights has successfully registered more than 600,000 published and unpublished images with the USCO through the service since its launch less than two years ago. The application is quick taking only a couple of minutes, simple with a high tech software that auto fills out the form, and most importantly accurate. With error checking technology, users can be assured their applications were filled out with all necessary information to protect images if an infringement claim is ever needed to be pursued. As a result of the accuracy of its applications and the long-standing relationship it has with the examiners at the USCO, ImageRights’ turnaround is among the fastest on the market, taking only a few weeks on average to receive the registration certificates versus the six to eight months cited on the copyright.gov website. Images can be registered through the website or by using the ImageRights Plugin for Adobe Lightroom.

ImageRights also inscribes the USCO registration number, date, status and deposit copies into the Bitcoin blockchain through their Blockchain Inscription Service. By using SHA2, an asymmetric cryptographic function, ImageRights can safely and automatically convert any file into a representative hash value. An effective and much faster alternative to requesting and paying for copies of the deposit copies from the USCO, the hash can be used as validated proof that a file containing the USCO registration information and images covered by the registration existed at that time and can be a valuable tool for expediting settlement negotiations for infringement claims.

“We strongly believe in photographers and agencies registering their images with the US Copyright Office and wanted to make our service readily available to all,” said Joe G. Naylor, President and CEO of ImageRights. “If the USCO form is not submitted the right way or the correct documentation of your work is not kept on file, photographers can be left vulnerable when pursuing an infringement claim. With our services they are 100% protected.”

Photographers and agencies can register their images with the US Copyright Office for $99 plus the Copyright Office filing fee at http://www.imagerights.com/copyrightregistration.

 

Webinar: “Social Media Strategy in the Consumer Revolution!”

WEBINAR
**Please note:  This will our last free webinar available to non-DMLA members

Social Media Strategy in the Consumer Revolution!

When: Wednesday, September 20, 1 PM Eastern

The impact of social media on today’s businesses can’t be overstated. Social media is one part disruptive technology, one part communication channel.   However, understanding why and how to use social media to the benefit of your business can be tricky.  Join us for this webinar that will address core concepts for building a social media strategy; engagement, social planning, framing the conversation, metrics and much, much more.

Our Guest Speaker:  Keith Quesenberry, Author, Professor and Social Media Expert

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Keith Quesenberry is an author, advertising executive, teacher and social media expert.  He is the author of Social Media Strategy: Marketing and Advertising in the Consumer Revolution which one reviewer compared to the legendary Ogilvy on Advertising for being well written, personable and drawing interesting and timeless parallels. Quesenberry spent 17 years in the marketing and advertising business as an associate creative director and copywriter at ad agencies such as BBDO and Arnold Worldwide.  He has worked with Fortune 500 brands like Delta Airlines, Exxon Mobile, PNC, Campbell’s and Hershey. 

In addition, Quesenberry is a contributing author to Harvard Business Review, Entrepreneur, Time, and Social Media Examiner. His articles have been recognized as Top 40 Content Marketing and Top 5 Visual Marketing articles of the year, Five Most Viral Marketing Posts from the Pros, and two were featured on the Harvard Business Review Weekly Hot List. He’s made marketing expert appearances on MSNBC TV, NPR, and been quoted in Harvard Business Review, the New York Times, the New Yorker, Entrepreneur, the International Business Times, Forbes, MS Money, MSN, Fox News, Fox Business, Variety, Yahoo News and AFP stories around the world.  

Quesenberry is an assistant marketing professor, researcher and consultant. He teaches in the undergraduate marketing program and graduate MBA program at Messiah college and the graduate IMC program at West Virginia University. He also previously taught at Johns Hopkins and Temple Universities. He holds a bachelors degree in Advertising and Journalism, is a graduate of the advertising school Portfolio Center and has a master’s degree in Integrated Marketing Communication.

Twitter: @Kquesen
linkedin.com/in/keithquesenberry
kquesen1@mix.wvu.edu
Social Media Strategy Book
bit.ly/QuesenberrySM

Our Moderator: Leslie Hughes, CEO, iSPY Visuals, Strategic Advisor, VisualSteam

Leslie Hughes career bridges creativity, content and technology.  Hughes founded and launched iSPY Visuals in 2016, a search aggregation tool for creative professionals, which is quickly growing into the starting place for clients searching for visual content.  She remains a strategic advisor to VisualSteam which focuses on digital marketing services to help companies grow.  Hughes has a long history in stock photography having been President of Corbis Images during its heyday, having been Group CEO of ImageState, and having run worldwide sales for The Image Bank.  Hughes is currently a member of the Board of Directors of DMLA and Chair of this Webinar Series

https://twitter.com/lesliehughesny
https://www.linkedin.com/in/lesliehughesny
http://visualsteam.com
http://ispyvisuals.com

Please RSVP to info@visualsteam.com with a “Yes” or “No”

Adobe Connect

https://dmla.adobeconnect.com/r3y7a4qoycp

at 1 PM EST on September 20
select “enter as guest” and provide your name then click “enter room”

Please mute the microphone at the top.

To connect by phone dial…

855.870.5454 (toll free)
or
408.773.6768 (international)

Conference code: 163 631 9537

If you’ve not used Adobe Connect previously, we suggest logging into the session a few minutes before the start to download and configure the neccesary software.

A big thank you to Adobe for providing this service for our webinars

View our previous webinars athttp://digitalmedialicensing.org/video-library.shtml

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DMLAsearch

DMLA is a unique community of visual media licensing professionals who share a common goal, building a stronger and more profitable industry.

For more information contact Cathy Aron, DMLA Executive Director, cathy@digitalmedialicensing.org

Ophelia Chong, Stock Pot Images, Does it All

 

Ophelia Chong, Program Chair for the DMLA 2017 Conference and Founder and CEO of Stock Pot Images is one those people who never stops.  She was recently featured in two articles about her business and one of her outreach projects.

“Today, the story of StockPot Images is rooted in many lives, and many realities, but it all began with Ophelia’s sister, who copes with an incurable disease.  She came to visit Ophelia and tried cannabis to help alleviate her symptoms.  Ophelia realized that this plant could help her promote her healing, health, and well being.  “How does the media portray people like my sister?”  The answer was with old stereotypes of potheads and such. This laid the groundwork for her mission: to advocate for the legalization of cannabis and offer truthful reflections of the faces and communities that embrace cannabis. ”

Congratulations Ophelia!  You bring great energy to DMLA!

COURT PERMITS COPYRIGHT CLAIM TO PROCEED DESPITE ERROR IN REGISTRATION APPLICATION.

For many copyright owners, especially those attempting to register works of visual arts, determining whether a work is published or unpublished for registration purposes is one of the more challenging issues and an impediment to registration. The District Court of the Southern District of New York, in Archie MD, Inc. v. Elsevier, Inc., (No. 16-CV-6614 (JSR), 2017 WL 3601180 (S.D.N.Y. Aug. 20, 2017)) recently clarified the standard by which a copyright registration may be considered valid despite containing inaccurate information.

Read the entire article here.

COURT PERMITS COPYRIGHT CLAIM TO PROCEED DESPITE REGISTRATION ERROR

Cowan DeBaets Abrahams & Sheppard, LLP by Mikaela Gross and Nancy Wolff

For many copyright owners, especially those attempting to register works of visual arts, determining whether a work is published or unpublished for registration purposes is one of the more challenging issues and an impediment to registration. The District Court of the Southern District of New York, in Archie MD, Inc. v. Elsevier, Inc., (No. 16-CV-6614 (JSR), 2017 WL 3601180 (S.D.N.Y. Aug. 20, 2017)) recently clarified the standard by which a copyright registration may be considered valid despite containing inaccurate information.

In 2005, Archie MD, Inc. entered into an Animation License Agreement (“ALA”) with the publisher Elsevier, Inc., under which Elsevier would license Archie’s library of 3-D medical animations for use in its various publications. About two weeks after entering into the ALA, and after Archie had delivered the works to Elsevier, Archie submitted a single copyright registration application for a group of unpublished works. This registration included the work at issue in this case, an animation entitled “Cell Differentiation.” The Copyright Office eventually registered the group of works on August 15, 2005.

In 2014, Archie gave Elsevier notice that it did not intend to renew the ALA, and the ALA expired on July 1, 2015. Archie subsequently file a copyright infringement action against Elsevier, alleging that after the expiration date, Elsevier continued to use hundreds previously licensed animations under the ALA and created unauthorized derivative works.

Both parties filed motions for summary judgment, and the SDNY granted defendant Elsevier’s motion as to all but two of Elsevier’s new animations, on the grounds that Elsevier’s continued use of previously licensed animations did not constitute unauthorized use under the ALA and most of the new animations by Elsevier were not substantially similar to Archie’s animations. As to the remaining claims based on the “Cell Differentiation” animation, Elsevier contended that Archie’s copyright registration in unpublished works was invalid because the work was in fact published, and as a result, the court should dismiss Archie’s claim in its entirety. The court denied Elsevier’s motion for summary judgement as to “Cell Differentiation” on the basis that although the registration for “Cell Differentiation” contained an inaccuracy (namely that the work was unpublished, when it in fact was), this was not fatal to the registration under 17 U.S.C. § 411(b)(1).

Section 411(b)(1) of the U.S. Copyright Act explains that a certificate of registration issued by the Copyright Office satisfies the registration prerequisite for filing a copyright infringement action regardless of the existence of inaccurate information in the certificate “unless— (A) the inaccurate information was included on the application for copyright registration with knowledge that it was inaccurate; and (B) the inaccuracy of the information, if known, would have caused the Register of Copyrights to refuse registration.” To determine whether Archie’s registration failed to satisfy this prerequisite, the court had to answer two questions: first, whether or not “Cell Differentiation” was published or unpublished, and second, if it was published, whether this inaccuracy on the certificate of registration was fatal to the registration’s validity.

As to the first question, the court held that “Cell Differentiation” was in fact published when Archie licensed and delivered the file to Elsevier. Reasoning that Archie’s delivery of the “Cell Differentiation” digital file pursuant to worldwide license to, among other things, distribute “Cell Differentiation” to the public, satisfies the Copyright Act’s definition of publication under 17 U.S.C. § 101 because it constitutes an “offering to distribute copies . . . to a group of persons for purposes of further distribution.” That Elsevier had not yet made any further distributions of “Cell Differentiation” at the time the copyright registration application was filed was irrelevant, because the licensing and delivery of the files was itself an offering.

Because the certificate of registration listed “Cell Differentiation” as unpublished, the court turned to the statute to answer the second question. If an applicant knew its application contained inaccurate information, and if the Register of Copyrights would have refused registration had she known of this inaccurate information, then a subsequent registration certificate is invalid for purposes of filing a copyright infringement action. 17 U.S.C. § 411(b)(2) requires that when an inaccuracy on a certification of registration is discovered, a court must ask the Register of Copyrights “whether the inaccurate information, if known, would have caused the Register of Copyrights to refuse registration.” The Register advised the court that she would have denied the application had she known of the inaccuracy in labeling “Cell Differentiation” unpublished. The key issue was whether Archie knew of the inaccuracy. Because the question of whether licensing a work constitutes publication was “an unsettled legal question at the time” Archie filed its copyright registration application in 2005, the court reasoned that Archie did not know of the inaccuracy. As a result Archi was able to proceed on its copyright claim for the work “Cell Differentiation”.

Publication remains a thorn in copyright owner’s side. While the plaintiff in this case was not considered to have knowledge that its works were published at the time of registration, those filing registrations after the later cases clarifying what is published will no longer have the benefit of this uncertainty. Because the Copyright Office would deny registration of an application with inaccurate information as to the works’ publication status, it is highly recommended that creators register works of visual art before any licensing agreements are signed or files are delivered for further distribution. Otherwise, published works, if photographs, can be registered by the photographer under a group registration of photographs application, but published and unpublished works are still required to be filed separately. Until this requirement is revised, visual artists will continue to face impediments to successful and effortless copyright registration.

 

 

 

Nancy Wolff Named to 2018 Edition of the Best Lawyers in America

Cowan, DeBaets, Abraham’s & Sheppard’s Law Practice had six attorneys selected for inclusion in the 2018 edition of Best Lawyers in America list. Among them is our own, Nancy Wolff, DMLA Counsel.

Nancy is currently President of the Copyright Society of the USA and she is a frequent speaker throughout the United States and Europe on issues relating to copyright, digital media, and licensing for many organizations including the American Bar Association, The Copyright Society, Practicing Law Institute (PLI), The Digital Media Licensing Association, and the European Confederation of Image Libraries and Archives (CEPIC). She frequently speaks at design schools and photography classes on issues relating to copyright, trademark, and publicity as it relates to the licensing of digital media.

This is such a well-deserved honor for Nancy.  We join the many others in offering our congratulations and good wishes to CDAS and to Nancy.

Alphabet’s Google acts to comply with EU antitrust order

DMLA has been a member of  Comp for the last few years in support of CEPIC and  EU companies working for a solution to the Google antitrust issue.  It looks like Google is FINALLY coming up with a solution to the anti-competition lawsuit.

It seems like the time is right for the U.S. to revisit the same problems here in our country and help businesses here regain their competitive edge on the internet.